Scott Hanselman

Visual Studio and IIS Error: Specified argument was out of the range of valid values. Parameter name: site

June 3, '17 Comments [12] Posted in Bugs | IIS
Sponsored By

I got a very obscure and obtuse error running an ASP.NET application under Visual Studio and IIS Express recently. I'm running a Windows 10 Insiders (Fast Ring) build, so it's likely an issue with that, but since I was able to resolve the issue simply, I figured I'd blog it for google posterity .

I would run the ASP.NET app from within Visual Studio and get this totally useless error. It was happening VERY early in the bootstrapping process and NOT in my application. It pretty clearly is happening somewhere in the depths of IIS Express, perhaps in a configurator in HttpRuntime.

Specified argument was out of the range of valid values.
Parameter name: site

I fixed it by going to Windows Features and installing "IIS Hostable Web Core," part of Internet Information Services. I did this in an attempt to "fix whatever's wrong with IIS Express."

Turn Windows Features on or off

That seems to "repair" IIS Express. I'll update this post if I learn more, but hopefully if you got to this post, this fixed it for you also.


Sponsor: Check out JetBrains Rider: a new cross-platform .NET IDE. Edit, refactor, test, build and debug ASP.NET, .NET Framework, .NET Core, or Unity applications. Learn more and get access to early builds!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb

Temporary Fix: Logitech BRIO Camera broken on Windows 10 Insiders 15042

February 25, '17 Comments [10] Posted in Bugs | Win10
Sponsored By

I just updated my Windows 10 to Insiders Fast Build 15042, and suddenly my glorious new Logitech BRIO 4k webcam doesn't work! Well, it's all beta software, but it turns out the issue is with something in the Logitech INF files for their drivers. I'm assuming they'll figure it out, but the nutshell is that the first install works, but the driver gets messed up on the upgrade. You can't just pull out the camera and put it in again, you need to DELETE the drivers and have them redownloaded by Windows Update/Device Manager.

Here's a temporary fix (either until Logitech fixes it and it shows up in Windows Update or you take another Windows 10 upgrade):

Logitech BRIO stops working on Windows 10 Insiders UPGRADE

Go to device manager and right click the device and Uninstall Driver. If it has the checkbox "Delete this driver" then check it. That's required. IF (like me) you don't have that checkbox (I'm not sure why I don't) then you'll need to delete the Logitech driver from the DriverStore. You can do it manually but it's tricky and messy and hard.

We need to delete this driver so it gets reinstalled cleanly.

Driver 2/31/2017

Unplug your webcam. Then, go get the latest copy of DriverStoreExplorer from here https://github.com/lostindark/DriverStoreExplorer/releases and delete JUST this one driver.

Using the Driver Store Explorer

Now, go back to Device Manager and plug in your Logitech BRIO webcam. Note you'll get some super old 2006 driver. Right click the BRIO in Imaging Devices and Update Driver. This will get you BACK to your original state. You still have a driver that will break when you next take a "major" Windows update or Insiders Build, but at least you have a solution until it magically gets fixed.

Yay!


Sponsor: Big thanks to Progress! They recently published a comprehensive whitepaper on The State of C#, discussing the history of C#, what’s new in C# 7 and whether C# is still a viable language. Check it out!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb

Fixed: Microsoft Edge can't see or open VirtualBox-hosted local web sites

December 2, '15 Comments [10] Posted in Bugs
Sponsored By

I'm using VirtualBox on a Windows 10 machine along with Docker to deploy ASP.NET websites to local Linux Containers. To be clear, this isn't accessing websites with http://localhost, this is accessing locally an VirtualBox virtual network.

For example, my local IP and subnet is here, but my VirtualBox is here:

Ethernet adapter Ethernet:
IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.140

Ethernet adapter VirtualBox Host-Only Network:
IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.99.1

Make sense? A Linux VM running Docker containers is then http://192.168.99.100, for example, on various ports.

Strangely, however, I was unable to access these VirtualBox-hosted websites with Microsoft Edge, while they worked on Chrome and Firefox. I wanted to fix this. Just saying "use another browser" isn't enough, I like to figure it out.

I ended up trying this, and oddly, I was right. Go to Start, type "Internet Options" then then the Security Tab, then click Local Intranet, then Sites. Add your Virtual Machine's IP (in this case, the Docker Host) in that list and you're golden.

Add your VirtualBox VM's IP in the local intranet list of sites

Now about the WHY....I have no idea. I'll report back as I keep poking around.


Sponsor: Big thanks to Infragistics for sponsoring the feed this week. Responsive web design on any browser, any platform and any device with Infragistics jQuery/HTML5 Controls.  Get super-charged performance with the world’s fastest HTML5 Grid - Download for free now!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb

FIXED: Blue Screen of Death (BSOD) 7E in HIDCLASS.SYS while installing Windows 7

June 8, '14 Comments [14] Posted in Bugs
Sponsored By

I was doing tech support for a friend this weekend. He was paving an old HP Envy laptop (although this happens on some Dell Inspirons as well) and was getting a blue screen in the middle of install. Then, of course, if you're not looking at it you'll just reboot and drop back into setup and get the "the computer restarted unexpectedly or encountered an unexpected error." At this point he was in a setup loop.

IMG_1519

"HIDCLASS.SYS" is the driver that failed. HID means Human Interface Device, and that means "keyboards or mice" for the most part.

IMG_1543

Errors in HIDCLASS.SYS, especially during setup, almost always means that there's trouble with an attached keyboard or attached mouse. I asked my buddy if he had a mouse attached and he did. He removed the mouse, and started setup over again. Setup succeeded. Then, he spent about an hour (and several reboots) getting Windows 7 "gold" (which was released in July of 2009, almost 5 years ago) up to date with patches, service pack 1, and the latest drivers. Then he was able to attach his mouse and it works fine.


Sponsor: Big thanks to Mindscape for joining us and sponsoring the blog feed this week! I discovered Raygun.io and started using it for my side project and I LOVE it. Get notified of your software’s bugs as they happen! Raygun.io has error tracking solutions for every major programming language and platform - Start a free trial in under a minute!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb

Fixing System.Core 2.0.5 FileLoadException, Portable Libraries and Windows XP support

May 8, '14 Comments [17] Posted in Bugs | Learning .NET | WPF
Sponsored By

Installing Windows XP to testMy buddy Greg and I are getting ready to launch our little side startup, and I was going through our product backlog. Our app consists of a global cloud service with Signalr, an iPhone app made with Xamarin tools, and a WPF app.

One of the items in our Trello backlog was "Support Windows XP. Gasp!"

I hadn't given this item much thought, but I figure it was worth a few hours look. If it was easy, why not, right?

Our WPF desktop application was written for .NET 4.5, which isn't supported on Windows XP.  I want to my app to support as basic and mainstream a .NET 4 installation as possible.

Could I change my app to target .NET 4 directly? I use the new async and await features extensively.

Well, of course, I remembered Microsoft released the Async Targeting Pack (Microsoft.Bcl.Async) through NuGet to do just this. In fact, if I was targeting .NET 3.5 I could use Omer Mor's AsyncBridge for .NET 3.5, so it's good that I have choices.

I changed my project to target .NET 4, rather than 4.5, installed these NuGets, and recompiled. No problem, right?

However, when I run my application on Windows XP it crashes immediately. Fortunately I have instrumented it with Raygun.io so all my crashes to to the cloud for analysis. It gives me this nice summary:

raygun.io is amazing 

Here's the important part:

FileLoadException: Could not load file or assembly 
'System.Core, Version=2.0.5.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=7cec85d7bea7798e, Retargetable=Yes'
or one of its dependencies. The given assembly name or codebase was invalid.
(Exception from HRESULT: 0x80131047)

That's weird, I'm using .NET 4 which includes System.Core version 4.0. I can confirm what's in the GAC (Global Assembly Cache) with this command at the command line. Remember, your computer isn't a black box.

C:\>gacutil /l | find /i "system.core"
System.Core, Version=3.5.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089, processorArchitecture=MSIL
System.Core, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089, processorArchitecture=MSIL

OK, so there isn't even a System.Core version 2.0.5 in the GAC. Turns out that System.Core 2.0.5 is the Portable Libraries version, meant to be used everywhere (that means, Silverlight, etc, everywhere) so they made the version number compatible.

Because we're building our iPhone app with Xamarin tools and we anticipate supporting other platforms, we use a Portable Library to share code. But, it seems that support for Portable Libraries were enabled on .NET 4 vanilla by the KB2468871 update.

I don't want to require any specific patch level or hotfixes. While this .NET 4 framework update was pushed to machines via Windows Update, for now I want to support the most basic install if I can. So if the issue is Portable Libraries (which I still want to use) then I'll want to bring those shared files in another way.

You can LINK source code in Visual Studio when you Add File by clicking the little dropdown and then Add as Link:

Adding source code as a Link within Visual Studio

Now my Messages.cs file is a link. See the little shortcut overlay in blue?

A linked file as a little overlay on the icon

I removed the project reference to the Portable Library for this WPF application and brought the code in this way. I'm still sharing core, but just not as a binary for this one application.

Recompile and redeploy and magically .NET 4 WPF application with async/await and MahApps.Metro styling starts up and runs wonderfully on this 12 year old OS with just .NET 4 installed.

For our application this means that my market just got opened up a little and now I can sell my product to the millions of pirated and forever unpatched Windows XP machines in the world. Which is a good thing.


Sponsor: Big thanks to Aspose for sponsoring the blog feed this week. Aspose.Total for .NET has all the APIs you need to create, manipulate and convert Microsoft Office documents and a host of other file formats in your applications. Curious? Start a free trial today.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb
Page 1 of 38 in the Bugs category Next Page

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.