Scott Hanselman

You can now download the new Open Source Windows Terminal

June 20, '19 Comments [23] Posted in Open Source | Win10
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Last month Microsoft announced a new open source Windows Terminal! It's up at https://github.com/microsoft/Terminal and it's great, but for the last several weeks you've had to build it yourself as a Developer. It's been very v0.1 if you know what I mean.

Today you can download the Windows Terminal from the Microsoft Store! This is a preview release (think v0.2) but it'll automatically update, often, from the Windows Store if you have Windows 10 version 18362.0 or higher. Run "winver" to make sure.

Windows Terminal

If you don't see any tabs, hit Ctrl-T and note the + and the pull down menu at the top there. Under the menu go to Settings to open profiles.json. Here's mine on one machine.

Here's some Hot Windows Terminal Tips

You can do background images, even animated, with opacity (with useAcrylic off):

"backgroundImage": "c:/users/scott/desktop/doug.gif",
"backgroundImageOpacity": 0.7,
"backgroundImageStretchMode": "uniformToFill

You can edit the key bindings to your taste in the "key bindings" section. For now, be specific, so the * might be expressed as Ctrl+Shift+8, for example.

Try other things like cursor shape and color, history size, as well as different fonts for each tab.

 "cursorShape": "vintage"

If you're using WSL or WSL2, use the distro name like this in your new profile:

"wsl.exe -d Ubuntu-18.04"

If you like Font Ligatures or use Powerline, consider Fira Code as a potential new font.

I'd recommend you PIN terminal to your taskbar and start menu, but you can run windows terminal from the command "wt" from Windows R or from anotherc console. That's just "wt" and enter!

Try not just "Ctrl+Mouse Scroll" but also "Ctrl+Shift+Mouse Scroll" and get your your whole life!

Remember that the definition of a shell is someone fluid, so check out Azure Cloud Shell, in your terminal!

Windows Terminal menus

Also, let's start sharing nice color profiles! Share your new ones as a Gist in this format. Note the name.

{
"background" : "#2C001E",
"black" : "#4E9A06",
"blue" : "#3465A4",
"brightBlack" : "#555753",
"brightBlue" : "#729FCF",
"brightCyan" : "#34E2E2",
"brightGreen" : "#8AE234",
"brightPurple" : "#AD7FA8",
"brightRed" : "#EF2929",
"brightWhite" : "#EEEEEE",
"brightYellow" : "#FCE94F",
"cyan" : "#06989A",
"foreground" : "#EEEEEE",
"green" : "#300A24",
"name" : "UbuntuLegit",
"purple" : "#75507B",
"red" : "#CC0000",
"white" : "#D3D7CF",
"yellow" : "#C4A000"
}

Note also that this should be the beginning of a wonderful Windows Console ecosystem. This isn't the one terminal to end them all, it's the one to start them all. I've loved alternative consoles for YEARS, whether it be ConEmu or Console2 many years ago, I've long declared that Text Mode is a missed opportunity.

Remember also that Terminal !== Shell and that you can bring your shell of choice into your Terminal of choice! If you want the deep architectural dive, be sure to watch the BUILD 2019 technical talk with some of the developers or read about ConPTY and how to integrate with it!


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Dynamically generating robots.txt for ASP.NET Core sites based on environment

June 18, '19 Comments [3] Posted in ASP.NET | DotNetCore | Open Source
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I'm putting part of older WebForms portions of my site that still run on bare metal to ASP.NET Core and Azure App Services, and while I'm doing that I realized that I want to make sure my staging sites don't get indexed by Google/Bing.

I already have a robots.txt, but I want one that's specific to production and others that are specific to development or staging. I thought about a number of ways to solve this. I could have a static robots.txt and another robots-staging.txt and conditionally copy one over the other during my Azure DevOps CI/CD pipeline.

Then I realized the simplest possible thing would be to just make robots.txt be dynamic. I thought about writing custom middleware but that sounded like a hassle and more code that needed. I wanted to see just how simple this could be.

  • You could do this as a single inline middleware, and just lambda and func and linq the heck out out it all on one line
  • You could write your own middleware and do lots of options, then activate it bested on env.IsStaging(), etc.
  • You could make a single Razor Page with environment taghelpers.

The last one seemed easiest and would also mean I could change the cshtml without a full recompile, so I made a RobotsTxt.cshtml single razor page. No page model, no code behind. Then I used the built-in environment tag helper to conditionally generate parts of the file. Note also that I forced the mime type to text/plain and I don't use a Layout page, as this needs to stand alone.

@page
@{
Layout = null;
this.Response.ContentType = "text/plain";
}
# /robots.txt file for http://www.hanselman.com/
User-agent: *
<environment include="Development,Staging">Disallow: /</environment>
<environment include="Production">Disallow: /blog/private
Disallow: /blog/secret
Disallow: /blog/somethingelse</environment>

I then make sure that my Staging and/or Production systems have ASPNETCORE_ENVIRONMENT variables set appropriately.

ASPNETCORE_ENVIRONMENT=Staging

I also want to point out what may look like odd spacing and how some text is butted up against the TagHelpers. Remember that a TagHelper's tag sometimes "disappears" (is elided) when it's done its thing, but the whitespace around it remains. So I want User-agent: * to have a line, and then Disallow to show up immediately on the next line. While it might be prettier source code to have that start on another line, it's not a correct file then. I want the result to be tight and above all, correct. This is for staging:

User-agent: *
Disallow: /

This now gives me a robots.txt at /robotstxt but not at /robots.txt. See the issue? Robots.txt is a file (or a fake one) so I need to map a route from the request for /robots.txt to the Razor page called RobotsTxt.cshtml.

Here I add a RazorPagesOptions in my Startup.cs with a custom PageRoute that maps /robots.txt to /robotstxt. (I've always found this API annoying as the parameters should, IMHO, be reversed like ("from","to") so watch out for that, lest you waste ten minutes like I just did.

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
services.AddMvc()
.AddRazorPagesOptions(options =>
{
options.Conventions.AddPageRoute("/robotstxt", "/Robots.Txt");
});
}

And that's it! Simple and clean.

You could also add caching if you wanted, either as a larger middleware, or even in the cshtml Page, like

context.Response.Headers.Add("Cache-Control", $"max-age=SOMELARGENUMBEROFSECONDS");

but I'll leave that small optimization as an exercise to the reader.

UPDATE: After I was done I found this robots.txt middleware and NuGet up on GitHub. I'm still happy with my code and I don't mind not having an external dependency, but it's nice to file this one away for future more sophisticated needs and projects.

How do you handle your robots.txt needs? Do you even have one?


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Visual Studio Code Remote Development over SSH to a Raspberry Pi is butter

June 11, '19 Comments [13] Posted in Hardware | Open Source | Python
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There's been a lot of folks, myself included, who have tried to install VS Code on the Raspberry Pi. In fact, there's a lovely process for this now. However, we have to ask ourselves is a Raspberry Pi really powerful enough to be running a full development environment and the app being debugged? Perhaps, but maybe this is a job for remote debugging. That means installing Visual Studio Code locally on my Windows or Mac machine, then having Visual Studio code install its headless server component (for ARM7) on the Pi.

In January I blogged about Remote Debugging with VS Code on a Raspberry Pi using .NET Core on ARM. It was, and is, a little hacked together with SSH and wishes. Let's set up a proper VS Code Remote environment so I can be productive on a Pi while still enjoying my main laptop's abilities.

  • First, can you ssh into your Raspberry Pi without a password prompt?
    • If not, be sure to set that up with OpenSSH, which is now installed on Windows 10 by default.
    • You know you've got it down when you can "ssh pi@mypi" and it just drops you into a remote prompt.
  • Next, get Visual Studio Code Insiders plus

From within VS Code Insiders, hit Ctrl/CMD+P and type "Remote-SSH" for some of the choices.

Remote-SSH options in VS Code

I can connect to Host and VS Code will SSH into the PI and install the VS Code server components in ~./vscode-server-insiders and then connect to them. It will take a minute as its downloading a 25 meg GZip and unzipping it into this temp folder. You'll know you're connected when you see this green badge as seen below that says "SSH: hostname."

Green badge in VS Code - SSH: crowpi

Then when you go "File | Open Folder" from the main menu, you'll get the remote system's files! You are working and editing locally on remote files.

My Raspberry Pi's desktop, remotely

Note here that some of the extensions are NOT installed locally! The Python language services (using Jedi) are running remotely on the Raspberry Pi, so when I get intellisense, I'm getting it remoted from the actual machine I'm developing on, not a guess from my local box.

Some extentions are local and others are remote

When I open a Terminal with Ctrl+~, see that I'm automatically getting a remote terminal and I've even running htop in it!

Check this out, I'm doing a remote interactive debugging session against CrowPi samples running on the Raspberry Pi (in Python 2) remotely from VS Code on my Windows 10 machine! I did need to make one change to the remote settings as it was defaulting to Python3 and I wanted to use Python2 for these samples.

Remote Debugging a Raspberry Pi

This has been a very smooth process and I remain super impressed with the VS Remote Development experience. I'll be looking at containers, and remote WSL debugging soon as well. Next step is to try C#, remotely, which will mean making sure the C# OmniSharp Extension works on ARM and remotely.


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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What's better than ILDasm? ILSpy and dnSpy are tools to Decompile .NET Code

May 30, '19 Comments [19] Posted in Open Source | Tools
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.NET code (C#, VB, F#, etc) compiles (for the most part) into Intermediate Language (IL) and then makes it way to native code usually by Just-in-time (JIT) compilation on the target machine. When you get a DLL/Assembly, it's pre-chewed but not full juiced, to mix my metaphors.

Often you'll come along a DLL that you want to learn more about. Sometimes you'll want to just see the structure of classes, methods, etc, and other times you want to see the IL - or a close representation of the original C#/VB/F#, etc. You're not looking at the source, you're seeing a backwards projection of the IL as whatever language you want. You're basically taking this pre-chewed food and taking it out of your mouth and getting a decent idea of what it was originally.

I've used ILDasm for years, but it's old and lame and people tease you for using it because they are cruel. ;)

Seriously, though, I use ILDasm - the IL Disassembler - simply because it's already installed. Those tweets got me thinking though that I need to update my options, so I'm trying out ILSpy and dnSpy.

ILSpy

ILSpy has been around for a while and has multiple front-ends, including ones for Linux/Mac/Windows based on Avalonia in the form of AvaloniaSpy. You can also integrate ILSpy into Visual Studio 2017 or 2019 with this extension. There is also a console decompiler and, interestingly, cross-platform PowerShell cmdlets.

ILSpy is a solid .NET decompiler

I've always liked the "Open List" feature of ILSpy where you can open a preconfigured list of assemblies you want to browse, like ASP.NET MVC, .NET 4, etc. A fun open source contribution for you might be to update the included lists with newer defaults. There's so many folks doing great work in open source out there, why not jump in and help them out?

dnSpy

dnSpy has a lovely UI AND a great Console app using the same engine. It's amazingly polished and VERY complete. I was surprised that it also has a full hex editor as well as property pages for common EXE file headers. From their GitHub, dnSpy features

  • Debug .NET Framework, .NET Core and Unity game assemblies, no source code required
  • Edit assemblies in C# or Visual Basic or IL, and edit all metadata
  • Light and dark themes
  • Extensible, write your own extension
  • High DPI support (per-monitor DPI aware)

dnSpy takes it to the next level with an integrated Debugger, meaning you can attach to a running process and debug it without source code - but it feels like source code because it's decompiling for you. Note where it says C#, I can choose C#, VB, or IL as a "view" on my decompiled code.

dnSpy is amazing for looking inside .NET apps

Here is dnSpy actually debugging ILSpy and stopped at a decompiled breakpoint.

image

There's a lot of great low-level stuff in this space. Another cool tool is Reflexil, a .NET Assembly Editor as well as de4dot by the same mysterious author as dnSpy. JetBrains has the excellent dotPeek and Telerik has JustDecompile. Commercial Tools include Reflector.

What's your favorite?


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Visual Studio Code Remote Development may change everything

May 21, '19 Comments [18] Posted in Docker | Open Source
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DevContainer using RustOK, that's a little clickbaity but it's surely impressed the heck out of me. You can read more about VS Code Remote Development (at the time of this writing, available in the VS Code Insiders builds) but here's a little on my first experience with it.

The Remote Development extensions require Visual Studio Code Insiders.

Visual Studio Code Remote Development allows you to use a container, remote machine, or the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) as a full-featured development environment. It effectively splits VS Code in half and runs the client part on your machine and the "VS Code Server" basically anywhere else. The Remote Development extension pack includes three extensions. See the following articles to get started with each of them:

  • Remote - SSH - Connect to any location by opening folders on a remote machine/VM using SSH.
  • Remote - Containers - Work with a sandboxed toolchain or container-based application inside (or mounted into) a container.
  • Remote - WSL - Get a Linux-powered development experience in the Windows Subsystem for Linux.

Lemme give a concrete example. Let's say I want to do some work in any of these languages, except I don't have ANY of these languages/SDKS/tools on my machine.

Aside: You might, at this point, have already decided that I'm overreacting and this post is nonsense. Here's the thing though when it comes to remote development. Hang in there.

On the Windows side, lots of folks creating Windows VMs in someone's cloud and then they RDP (Remote Desktop) into that machine and push pixels around, letting the VM do all the work while you remote the screen. On the Linux side, lots of folks create Linux VMs or containers and then SSH into them with their favorite terminal, run vim and tmux or whatever, and then they push text around, letting the VM do all the work while you remote the screen. In both these scenarios you're not really client/server, you're terminal/server or thin client/server. VS Code is a thick client with clean, clear interfaces to language services that have location transparency.

I type some code, maybe an object instance, then intellisense is invoked with a press of "." - who does that work? Where does that list come from? If you're running code locally AND in the container, then you need to make sure both sides are in sync, same SDKs, etc. It's challenging.

OK, I don't have the Rust language or toolkit on my machine.

I'll clone this repository:

git clone https://github.com/Microsoft/vscode-remote-try-rust

Then I'll run Code, the Insiders version:

C:\github> git clone https://github.com/Microsoft/vscode-remote-try-rust   
Cloning into 'vscode-remote-try-rust'...
Unpacking objects: 100% (38/38), done.
C:\github> cd .\vscode-remote-try-rust\
C:\github\vscode-remote-try-rust [main =]> code-insiders .

Then VS Code says, hey, this is a Dev Container, want me to open it?

There's a devcontainer.json file that has a list of extensions that the project needs. And it will install those VS Extensions inside a Development Docker Container and then access them remotely. This isn't a list of extensions that your LOCAL system needs - you don't want to sully your system with 100 extensions. You want to have just those extensions that you need for the project you're working on. Compartmentalization. You could do development and never install anything on your local machine, but you're finding a sweet spot that doesn't involved pushing text or pixels around.

Reopen in Container

Now look at this screenshot and absorb. It's setting up a dockerfile, sure, with the development tools you want to use and then it runs docker exec and brings in the VS Code Server!

Setting up Rust

Check out the Extensions section of VS Code, and check out the lower left corner. That green status bar shows that we're in a client/server situation. The extensions specific to Rust are installed in the Dev Container and we are using them from VS Code.

Extensions

When I'm typing and working on my code in this way (by the way it took just minutes to get started) I've got a full experience with Intellisense, Debugging, etc.

Intellisense from a container running Rust and VS Code Remote Containers

Here I am doing a live debug session of a Rust app with zero setup other than VS Code Insiders, the Remote Extensions, and Docker (which I already had).

Debugging in VS Code a Rust app within a DevContainer

As I mentioned, you can run within WSL, Containers, or over SSH. It's early days but it's extraordinarily clean. I'm really looking forward to seeing how far and effortless this style of development can go. There's so much less yak shaving! It effectively removes the whole setup part of your coding experience and you get right to it.


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.