Scott Hanselman

Suggestions and Tips for attending your first tech conference

May 17, '17 Comments [20] Posted in Musings | Open Source
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This last week Joseph Phillips tweeted that he was going to his first big tech conference and wanted some tips and suggestions. I have a TON of tips, but I know YOU have more, so I retweeted his request and prompted folks to reply. This was well timed as I had just gotten back from OSCON and BUILD, two great conferences.

The resulting thread was fantastic, so I've pulled some of the best recommendations out. As per usual, the Community has some great ideas and you should check them out!

  • @saraford - Whenever you get a biz card write down why you met them or what convo was about. It might seem obvious at time but you wont remember at home
  • @arcdigg - Meet people and speakers. Tech is part of your success, but growing your network matters too. Conf can give you both or not. Up to you!
  • @marypcbuk - if approaching people is hard for you, just ask 'what do you work on?'
  • @ohhoe - don't be afraid to introduce yrself to people! let them know its yr first conference, often people will introduce you to other people too :)
  • @IrishSQL - connect with a few attendees/speakers online prior to event, and bring plenty of business cards. When u get one, write details on back
  • @arcdigg - Backpack and sneakers beat cute laptop bag and heels (ed: dress comfortably)
  • @scribblingon - You might feel left out & think everyone knows everyone else. Don't be afraid to approach people & talk even if seems random sometimes :) If you liked someone's talk, strike a convo & tell them that!!
  • @arcdigg - Plan session attendance in advance, have a backup in case the session is full.
  • @jesslynnrose - Reach out to some other folks who are using the hashtag before you get there, events can be cliquey, say hi and make friends before you go!
  • @thelarkinn - Never feel afraid to say hi to maintainers, and speakers!!!! Especially if you want to help!
  • @everettharper - Pick 3 ppl you want to meet. Prep 1 Q for each. Go early, find person #1 in the 1st hr before crowds. 1/3 done = momentum for rest of day!
  • @jorriss - Meet people. Skip sessions. You'll get more from meeting and talking with people then sitting in the sessions. #hallwaytrack
  • @stabbycutyou - Leave room in your schedule, Meet people, Eavesdrop on hallway convos, Take notes, Present on them at your job
  • @patrickfoley - Don't forget to sleep. Evidence that long-term memories get "written" then
  • @david_t_macknet - Drinking will not help you remember it better or have a better time mingling. Most of us are just as introverted & the awkwardness fades.
  • @carlowahlstedt - Don't feel like you have to go to EVERY session.
  • @davidpine7 - Try your best to NOT be an introvert -- in our industry that can be challenging, but if you put yourself out there...you will not regret it!
  • @frontvu - Don't rely on the conference wifi
  • @shepherddad - Put snacks in your bag or pocket.
  • @sod1102 - Find out if there will be slides (and even better!) video available post conference, then don't worry about missing stuff and relax & enjoy
  • @rnelson0 - Take notes. Live tweet, carry a notebook, jot it all down at 1am before sleeping, whatever method helps you remember what you did.
  • @hoyto - Sit [at] meal tables with random people and introduce yourself.
  • @_s_hari - Ask speaker when *not* to use product/methodology that they're speaking on. If they cannot explain that, then it's just a marketing session
  • @EricFishor - Don't be afraid to discreetly leave or enter an on going session. It's up to you to seek out sessions that interest you.
  • @texmandie - If you get to meet and talk to your heroes, don't freak out - they're normal people who happen to do cool stuff
  • @wilbers_ke - Greatest connections happen in the hallways, coffee queue and places with animated humans. Minimize seated conference halls
  • @CJohnsonO365 - CLEAR YOUR SCHEDULE. Don’t try to get “regular” work done during the conference— you’ll end up missing something important!
  • @g33konaut - Tweet with the conf hashtag to ask if people wanna meet and talk or hangout after the conference, also follow the hashtag tweets to find ppl. Don't sweat missing a talk, meeting people and talking to them is always better than than seeing a talk. Also the talks are often recorded
  • @foxdeploy - Who cares about swag, it's all about connections. Meet the people who've helped you over the years and say thanks.
  • @jfletch - Ask people which after parties they are attending. Great way to find out about smaller/more interesting events and get yourself invited!
  • @marxculture - The Law of Two Feet - if you aren't enjoying a session then leave. Go to at least one thing outside your normal sphere.
  • @joshkodroff - Bring work business cards if you're not looking for a job, personal business cards if you are.
  • @benjimawoo - Go to sessions that cover tehnologies you wouldn't otherwise encounter day to day. Techs you don't use in your day job.

Fantastic stuff. You'll get more out of a conference if you say hello, include the "hallway track" in your planning, stay off your phone and laptop, and check out sessions and tech you don't usually work on.

What are YOUR suggestions? Sound off in the comments.


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Writing and debugging Linux C++ applications from Visual Studio using the "Windows Subsystem for Linux"

April 3, '17 Comments [19] Posted in Linux | Open Source | Win10
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I've blogged about the "Windows Subsystem for Linux" (also known as "Bash on Ubuntu on Windows") many times before. Response to this Windows feature has been a little funny because folks try to:

  • Minimize it - "Oh, it's just Cygwin." (It's actually not, it's the actual Ubuntu elf binaries running on a layer that abstracts the Linux kernel.)
  • Design it - "So it's a docker container? A VM?" (Again, it's a whole subsystem. It does WAY more than you'd think, and it's FASTer than a VM.)

Here's a simple explanation from Andrew Pardoe:

1. The developer/user uses a bash shell.
2. The bash shell runs on an install of Ubuntu
3. The Ubuntu install runs on a Windows subsystem. This subsystem is designed to support Linux.

It's pretty cool. WSL has, frankly, kept me running Windows because I can run cmd, powershell, OR bash (or zsh or Fish). You can run vim, emacs, tmux, and run Javascript/node.js, Ruby, Python, C/C++, C# & F#, Rust, Go, and more. You can also now run sshd, MySQL, Apache, lighttpd as long as you know that when you close your last console the background services will shut down. Bash on Windows is for developers, not background server apps. And of course, you apt-get your way to glory.

Bash on Windows runs Ubuntu user-mode binaries provided by Canonical. This means the command-line utilities are the same as those that run within a native Ubuntu environment.

I wanted to write a Linux Console app in C++ using Visual Studio in Windows. Why? Why not? I like VS.

Setting up Visual Studio 2017 to compile and debug C++ apps on Linux

Then, from the bash shell make sure you have build-essential, gdb's server, and openssh's server:

$ sudo apt update
$ sudo apt install -y build-essential
$ sudo apt install -y gdbserver
$ sudo apt install -y openssh-server

Then open up /etc/ssh/sshd_config with vi (or nano) like

sudo nano /etc/ssh/sshd_config

and for simplicity's sake, set PasswordAuthentication to yes. Remember that it's not as big a security issue as you'd think as the SSHD daemon closes when your last console does, and because WSL's subsystem has to play well with Windows, it's privy to the Windows Firewall and all its existing rules, plus we're talking localhost also.

Now generate SSH keys and manually start the service:

$ sudo ssh-keygen -A
$ sudo service ssh start

Create a Linux app in Visual Studio (or open a Makefile app):

File | New Project | Cross Platform | Linux

Make sure you know your target (x64, x86, ARM):

Remote GDB Debugger options

In Visual Studio's Cross Platform Connection Manager you can control your SSH connections (and set up ones with private keys, if you like.)

Tools | Options | Cross Platfrom | Connection Manager

Boom. I'm writing C++ for Linux in Visual Studio on Windows...running, compiling and debugging on the local Linux Subsystem

I'm writing C++ in Visual Studio on Windows talking to the local Linux Subsystem

BTW, for those of you, like me, who love your Raspberry Pi tiny Linux computers...this is a great way to write C++ for those little devices as well. There's even a Blink example in File | New Project to start.

Also, for those of you who are very advanced, stop using Mingw-w64 and do cool stuff like compiling gcc 6.3 from source under WSL and having VS use that! I didn't realize that Visual Studio's C++ support lets you choose between a number of C++ compilers including both GCC and Clang.


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Command Line: Using dotnet watch test for continuous testing with .NET Core 1.0 and XUnit.net

March 27, '17 Comments [14] Posted in DotNetCore | Open Source
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I've installed .NET Core 1.0 on my machine. Let's see if I can get a class library and tests running and compiling automatically using only the command line. (Yes, some of you are freaked out by my (and other folks') appreciation of a nice, terse command line. Don't worry. You can do all this with a mouse if you want. I'm just enjoying the CLI.

NOTE: This is considerably updated from the project.json version in 2016.

First, I installed from http://dot.net/core. This should all work on Windows, Mac, or Linux.

C:\> md testexample & cd testexample

C:\testexample> dotnet new sln
Content generation time: 33.0582 ms
The template "Solution File" created successfully.

C:\testexample> dotnet new classlib -n mylibrary -o mylibrary
Content generation time: 40.5442 ms
The template "Class library" created successfully.

C:\testexample> dotnet new xunit -n mytests -o mytests
Content generation time: 87.5115 ms
The template "xUnit Test Project" created successfully.

C:\testexample> dotnet sln add mylibrary\mylibrary.csproj
Project `mylibrary\mylibrary.csproj` added to the solution.

C:\testexample> dotnet sln add mytests\mytests.csproj
Project `mytests\mytests.csproj` added to the solution.

C:\testexample> cd mytests

C:\testexample\mytests> dotnet add reference ..\mylibrary\mylibrary.csproj
Reference `..\mylibrary\mylibrary.csproj` added to the project.

C:\testexample\mytests> cd ..

C:\testexample> dotnet restore
Restoring packages for C:\Users\scott\Desktop\testexample\mytests\mytests.csproj...
Restoring packages for C:\Users\scott\Desktop\testexample\mylibrary\mylibrary.csproj...
Restore completed in 586.73 ms for C:\Users\scott\Desktop\testexample\mylibrary\mylibrary.csproj.
Installing System.Diagnostics.TextWriterTraceListener 4.0.0.
...SNIP...
Installing Microsoft.NET.Test.Sdk 15.0.0.
Installing xunit.runner.visualstudio 2.2.0.
Installing xunit 2.2.0.
Generating MSBuild file C:\Users\scott\Desktop\testexample\mytests\obj\mytests.csproj.nuget.g.props.
Generating MSBuild file C:\Users\scott\Desktop\testexample\mytests\obj\mytests.csproj.nuget.g.targets.
Writing lock file to disk. Path: C:\Users\scott\Desktop\testexample\mytests\obj\project.assets.json
Installed:
16 package(s) to C:\Users\scott\Desktop\testexample\mytests\mytests.csproj

C:\testexample> cd mytests & dotnet test

Build started, please wait...
Build completed.

Test run for C:\testexample\mytests\bin\Debug\netcoreapp1.1\mytests.dll(.NETCoreApp,Version=v1.1)
Microsoft (R) Test Execution Command Line Tool Version 15.0.0.0
Copyright (c) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

Starting test execution, please wait...
[xUnit.net 00:00:00.5539676] Discovering: mytests
[xUnit.net 00:00:00.6867799] Discovered: mytests
[xUnit.net 00:00:00.7341661] Starting: mytests
[xUnit.net 00:00:00.8691063] Finished: mytests

Total tests: 1. Passed: 1. Failed: 0. Skipped: 0.
Test Run Successful.
Test execution time: 1.8329 Seconds

Of course, I'm testing nothing yet but pretend there's a test in the tests.cs and something it's testing (that's why I added a reference) in the library.cs, OK?

Now I want to have my project build and tests run automatically as I make changes to the code. I can't "dotnet add tool" yet so I'll add this line to my test's project file:

<ItemGroup>
<DotNetCliToolReference Include="Microsoft.DotNet.Watcher.Tools" Version="1.0.0" />
</ItemGroup>

Like this:

Adding <DotNetCliToolReference Include="Microsoft.DotNet.Watcher.Tools" Version="1.0.0" />

Then I just dotnet restore to bring in the tool.

In order to start the tests, I don't write dotnet test, I run "dotnet watch test." The main command is watch, and then WATCH calls TEST. You can also dotnet watch run, etc.

NOTE: There's a color bug using only cmd.exe so on "DOS" you'll see some ANSI chars. That should be fixed in a minor release soon - the PR is in and waiting. On bash or PowerShell things look fin.

In this screenshot, you can see as I make changes to my test and hit save, the DotNetWatcher Tool sees the change and restarts my app, recompiles, and re-runs the tests.

Test Run Successful

All this was done from the command line. I made a solution file, made a library project and a test project, made the test project reference the library, then built and ran the tests. If I could add the tool from the command line I wouldn't have had to manually touch the project file at all.

Again, to be sure, all this is stuff you can (and do) do in Visual Studio manually all the time. But I'll race you anytime. ;)


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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dotnet new angular and dotnet new react

February 13, '17 Comments [30] Posted in Javascript | Open Source | VS2017
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I was exploring the "dotnet new" experience last week and how you can extend templates, then today the .NET WebDev blog posted about Steve Sanderson's work around Single Page Apps (SPA). Perfect timing!

image

Since I have Visual Studio 2017 RC and my .NET Core SDK tools are also RC4:

C:\Users\scott\Desktop\fancypants>dotnet --info
.NET Command Line Tools (1.0.0-rc4-004771)

Product Information:
Version: 1.0.0-rc4-004771
Commit SHA-1 hash: 4228198f0e

Runtime Environment:
OS Name: Windows
OS Version: 10.0.15031
OS Platform: Windows
RID: win10-x64
Base Path: C:\Program Files\dotnet\sdk\1.0.0-rc4-004771

I can then do this from the dotnet command line interface (CLI) and install the SPA templates:

dotnet new --install Microsoft.AspNetCore.SpaTemplates::*

The * is the package version so this is getting the latest templates from NuGet. I'm looking forward to using YOUR templates (docs are coming! These are fresh hot bits.)

This command adds new templates to dotnet new. You can see the expanded list here:

Templates                                     Short Name      Language      Tags
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Console Application console [C#], F# Common/Console
Class library classlib [C#], F# Common/Library
Unit Test Project mstest [C#], F# Test/MSTest
xUnit Test Project xunit [C#], F# Test/xUnit
Empty ASP.NET Core Web Application web [C#] Web/Empty
MVC ASP.NET Core Web Application mvc [C#], F# Web/MVC
MVC ASP.NET Core with Angular angular [C#] Web/MVC/SPA
MVC ASP.NET Core with Aurelia aurelia [C#] Web/MVC/SPA
MVC ASP.NET Core with Knockout.js knockout [C#] Web/MVC/SPA
MVC ASP.NET Core with React.js react [C#] Web/MVC/SPA
MVC ASP.NET Core with React.js and Redux reactredux [C#] Web/MVC/SPA
Web API ASP.NET Core Web Application webapi [C#] Web/WebAPI
Solution File sln Solution

See there? Now I've got "dotnet new react" or "dotnet new angular" which is awesome. Now I just "npm install" and "dotnet restore" followed by a "dotnet run" and very quickly I have a great starter point for a SPA application written in ASP.NET Core 1.0 running on .NET Core 1.0. It even includes a dockerfile if I like.

From the template, to help you get started, they've also set up:

  • Client-side navigation. For example, click Counter then Back to return here.
  • Server-side prerendering. For faster initial loading and improved SEO, your Angular 2 app is prerendered on the server. The resulting HTML is then transferred to the browser where a client-side copy of the app takes over. THIS IS HUGE.
  • Webpack dev middleware. In development mode, there's no need to run the webpack build tool. Your client-side resources are dynamically built on demand. Updates are available as soon as you modify any file.
  • Hot module replacement. In development mode, you don't even need to reload the page after making most changes. Within seconds of saving changes to files, your Angular 2 app will be rebuilt and a new instance injected is into the page.
  • Efficient production builds. In production mode, development-time features are disabled, and the webpack build tool produces minified static CSS and JavaScript files.

Go and read about these new SPA templates in depth on the WebDev blog.


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Trying out "dotnet new" template updates and csproj with VS2017

February 7, '17 Comments [28] Posted in Open Source | VS2017
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I updated my Visual Studio 2017 RC installation today. Here's the release notes. You just run "Visual Studio Installer" if you've already got a version installed and it updates. The updating processes reminds me a little of how Office 365 updates itself. It's not as scary as VS updates of the past. You can download the VS2017 RC at https://www.visualstudio.com and it works side by side with your existing installs. I haven't had any issues yet.

New Templating Engine for .NET Core CLI

It also added/updated a new .NET Core SDK. I am a fan of the command line "dotnet.exe" tooling and I've been pushing for improvements in that experience. A bunch of stuff landed in this update that I've been waiting for. Here's dotnet new:

C:\Users\scott\Desktop\poop> dotnet new
Template Instantiation Commands for .NET Core CLI.

Usage: dotnet new [arguments] [options]

Arguments:
template The template to instantiate.

Options:
-l|--list List templates containing the specified name.
-lang|--language Specifies the language of the template to create
-n|--name The name for the output being created. If no name is specified, the name of the current directory is used.
-o|--output Location to place the generated output.
-h|--help Displays help for this command.
-all|--show-all Shows all templates


Templates Short Name Language Tags
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Console Application console [C#], F# Common/Console
Class library classlib [C#], F# Common/Library
Unit Test Project mstest [C#], F# Test/MSTest
xUnit Test Project xunit [C#], F# Test/xUnit
Empty ASP.NET Core Web Application web [C#] Web/Empty
MVC ASP.NET Core Web Application mvc [C#], F# Web/MVC
Web API ASP.NET Core Web Application webapi [C#] Web/WebAPI
Solution File sln Solution

Examples:
dotnet new mvc --auth None --framework netcoreapp1.0
dotnet new console --framework netcoreapp1.0
dotnet new --help

There is a whole new templating engine now. The code is here https://github.com/dotnet/templating and you can read about how to make your own templates or on the wiki.

I did a "dotnet new xunit" and it made the csproj file and a Unit Test. Here's what's inside the csproj:

<Project Sdk="Microsoft.NET.Sdk">
  <PropertyGroup>
    <OutputType>Exe</OutputType>
    <TargetFramework>netcoreapp1.0</TargetFramework>
  </PropertyGroup>
  <ItemGroup>
    <PackageReference Include="Microsoft.NET.Test.Sdk" Version="15.0.0-preview-20170123-02" />
    <PackageReference Include="xunit" Version="2.2.0-beta5-build3474" />
    <PackageReference Include="xunit.runner.visualstudio" Version="2.2.0-beta5-build1225" />
  </ItemGroup>
</Project>

That's not too bad. Here's a a library with no references:

<Project Sdk="Microsoft.NET.Sdk">
  <PropertyGroup>
    <TargetFramework>netstandard1.4</TargetFramework>
  </PropertyGroup>
</Project>

Note there's no GUIDs in the csproj. Sweet.

Remember also that there was talk that you wouldn't have to edit your csproj manually? Check this out:

C:\Users\scott\Desktop\poop\lib> dotnet add package Newtonsoft.Json
Microsoft (R) Build Engine version 15.1.545.13942
Copyright (C) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

Writing C:\Users\scott\AppData\Local\Temp\tmpBA1D.tmp
info : Adding PackageReference for package 'Newtonsoft.Json' into project 'C:\Users\scott\Desktop\poop\lib\lib.csproj'.
log : Restoring packages for C:\Users\scott\Desktop\poop\lib\lib.csproj...
info : GET https://api.nuget.org/v3-flatcontainer/newtonsoft.json/index.json
info : OK https://api.nuget.org/v3-flatcontainer/newtonsoft.json/index.json 1209ms
info : GET https://api.nuget.org/v3-flatcontainer/newtonsoft.json/9.0.1/newtonsoft.json.9.0.1.nupkg
info : OK https://api.nuget.org/v3-flatcontainer/newtonsoft.json/9.0.1/newtonsoft.json.9.0.1.nupkg 181ms
info : Package 'Newtonsoft.Json' is compatible with all the specified frameworks in project 'C:\Users\scott\Desktop\poop\lib\lib.csproj'.
info : PackageReference for package 'Newtonsoft.Json' version '9.0.1' added to file 'C:\Users\scott\Desktop\poop\lib\lib.csproj'.

Doing "dotnet add package foo.bar" automatically gets the package from NuGet and adds it to your csproj. Just like doing "Add NuGet Package" (or add reference) in Visual Studio. You don't even have to open or look at your csproj.

I'm going to keep digging into this. We're getting into a nice place where someone could easily make a custom template then "nuget in" that templates then "File | New | Your Company's Template" without needed yeoman, etc.

Please shared your feedback:

Also, be sure to check out the new and growing Docs site at https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.