Scott Hanselman

Use a second laptop as an extended monitor with Windows 10 wireless displays

October 18, '17 Comments [17] Posted in Tools | Win10
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James Clarke from the Windows team rolled into a meeting today with two Surfaces...but one had no keyboard. Then, without any ceremony, he proceeded to do this:

Holy Crap a Surface as a Second Monitor

Now, I consider myself a bit of a Windows Productivity Tips Gourmand, and while I was aware of Miracast and the general idea of a Wireless Display, I didn't realize that it worked this well and that it was built into Windows 10.

In fact, I'm literally sitting here in a hotel with a separate USB3 LCD display panel to use as a second monitor. I've also used Duet Display and used my iPad Pro as a second monitor.

I usually travel with a main laptop and a backup laptop anyway. Why do I lug this extra LCD around? Madness. I had this functionality all the time, built in.

Use your second laptop as a second monitor

On the machine you want to use as a second monitor, head over to Settings | System | Projecting to this PC and set it up as you like, considering convenience vs. security.

Settings | Projecting to this PC

Then, from your main machine - the one you are projecting from - just hit Windows Key+P, like you were projecting to a projector or second display. At the bottom, hit Connect to a Wireless Display.

Connect to a Wireless Display

Then wait a bit as it scans around for your PC. You can extend or duplicate...just like another monitor...

Connected to a Wireless Display

...because Windows thinks it IS another monitor.

You can also do this with Miracast TVs like my LG, or your Roku or sometimes Amazon Fires, or you can get a Microsoft Wireless Display Adapter and HDMI to any monitor - even ones at hotels!

NOTE: It's not super fast. It's sometimes pixelly and sometimes slow, depending on what's going on around you. But I just moved Chrome over onto my other machine and watched a YouTube video, just fine. I wouldn't play a game on it, but browsing, dev, typing, coding, works just fine!

Get ready for this. You can ALSO use the second machine as a second collaboration point! That means that someone else could PAIR with you and also type and move their mouse. THIS makes pair programming VERY interesting.

 Allow input from the remote display

Here's a video of it in action:

Give it a try and let me know how it goes. I used two Surfaces, but I also have extended my display to a 3 year old Lenovo without issues.


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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How to control PowerPoint on Windows with a Bluetooth Nintendo Switch JoyCon controller! (or a Surface Pen)

April 10, '17 Comments [4] Posted in Tools
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I usually use a Logitech Presentation Clicker to control PowerPoint presentations, but I'm always looking for new ways. Michael Samarin has a great app called KeyPenX that lets you use a Surface pen to control PowerPoint!

However, I've also got this wonderful Nintendo Switch and two JoyCon controllers. Rachel White reminded me that they are BlueTooth! So why not pair them to your machine and map some of their buttons to keystrokes?

Let's do it!

First, hold the round button on the black side of the controller between the SL and SR buttons, then go into Windows Settings and Add Bluetooth Device.

Add a Bluetooth Device

You can add them both if you like! They show up like Game Controllers to Windows:

Hey a JoyCon is a JoyStick to Windows!

Ah, but these are Joysticks. We need to map JoyStick Actions to Key Presses. Enter JoyToKey. If you keep using it (even though you can use it free) it's Shareware, you can buy JoyToKey for just $7.

Hold down a button on your Joystick/Joycon to see what it maps to. For example, here I'm clicking in on the stick and I can see that's Button 12.

Using JoyToKey to map JoyCons to PowerPoint

Map them anyway you like. I mapped left and right to PageUp and PageDown so now I can control PowerPoint!

Using JoyToKey to map JoyCons to PowerPoint

And here it is in action:

ZOMG YOU CAN CONTROL POWERPOINT WITH THE #NintendoSwitch JoyCon! /ht @ohhoe

A post shared by Scott Hanselman (@shanselman) on


So fun! Enjoy!


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Apt-Get for Windows - OneGet and Chocolatey on Windows 10

August 5, '15 Comments [49] Posted in Open Source | Tools | Win10
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In 2013 I asked the questions "Is the Windows user ready for apt-get?" As with nearly all my blog posts, the comments are better than the post itself. ;)

Now it's 2015 and many of us are upgrading to Windows 10. One of the little gems in Windows 10 that no one is talking about (yet) is OneGet. You can read about OneGet architecture here.

Installing applications in Windows 10 from the command line

It's easy (and wrong) to just say that One-Get is Apt-Get for Windows. But OneGet isn't actually a package manager. It's more clever and cooler than that.  It's a package manager manager.

OneGet is a Manager of Package Managers 

Go out to you Windows 10 PowerShell prompt now and type "Get-PackageProvider" and you'll see the package managers you have registered with OneGet today.

C:\> Get-PackageProvider

Name Version
---- -------
Programs 10.0.10240.16384
msu 10.0.10240.16384
msi 10.0.10240.16384
PSModule 1.0.0.0

Usually programs are installed with things like MSIs, for example, so there's a provider for that. You can type "Get-Package" and see the programs AND packages on your machine:

C:\> Get-Package

Name Version
---- -------
123D Design R1.6 1.6.41
Windows Driver Package - Ge... 06/04/2011 8....
Windows Driver Package - Ge... 06/19/2014 8....
Windows Driver Package - FT... 01/27/2014 2....
JRuby 1.7.19 1.7.19
Windows Driver Package - ST... 11/09/2009 3....
EPSON NX410 Series Printer ...
Intel Edison Device USB driver 1.2.1

Since it's PowerShell, you can sort and filter and what-not to your heart's delight.

OneGet isn't Microsoft's Chocolately

Chocolatey is an open source apt-get-like machine-wide package manager that you can use today, even if you don't have Windows 10.

OneGet isn't Microsoft's version of Chocolately. But there is a beta/preview Chocolatey provider that plugs into OneGet so you can use OneGet to get Chocolatey packages and install them.

Other things worth noting, even though OneGet is in the box for Windows 10, you can still run it on Windows 7 and Windows 2008 R2. Plus, OneGet isn't done and it's open source so there's lots of cool possibilities.

Oh, and an important naming point. Just like "Chromium" is the open source browser and "Chrome" is the Google packaged instance of that project, "OneGet" is the open source project and what ships with Windows 10 is just generically "PackageManagement." Just a good reminder of the relationship between open source projects and their shipping counterparts.

Installing VLC using OneGet and Chocolatey on Windows 10

Example time. You've got a new Windows 10 machine and you want to get VLC. You can (and should) totally get it from the Windows Store, but let's get it using Package Management.

Here I need to get the beta Chocotlatey provider first, and once, with "get-packageprovider -name chocolatey." Also, when I install a package for the first time it will prompt to download NuGet as well. I will answer Yes to both.

NOTE: You can also install Chocolatey explicitly with "install-package –provider bootstrap chocolatey"

Now I can just "install-package vlc" and it will get it from the Chocolatey repository.

C:\>  get-packageprovider -name chocolatey

The provider 'chocolatey v2.8.5.130' is not installed.
chocolatey may be manually downloaded from https://oneget.org/ChocolateyPr30.exe and installed.
Would you like PackageManagement to automatically download and install 'chocolatey'?

[Y] Yes [N] No [S] Suspend [?] Help (default is "Y"): y

Name Version
---- -------
Chocolatey 2.8.5.130

C:\> install-package vlc

The provider 'nuget v2.8.5.127' is not installed.
nuget may be manually downloaded from https://oneget.org/nuget-anycpu-2.8.5.127.exe and installed.
Would you like PackageManagement to automatically download and install 'nuget' now?
[Y] Yes [N] No [S] Suspend [?] Help (default is "Y"): y

The package(s) come from a package source that is not marked as trusted.
Are you sure you want to install software from 'chocolatey'?
[Y] Yes [A] Yes to All [N] No [L] No to All [S] Suspend [?] Help (default is "N"): y

Name Version Source Summary
---- ------- ------ -------
vlc 2.2.1.20150630 chocolatey VLC Media Player

Boom. Now VLC is installed. It's early days but it's interesting stuff!

You can read about the available OneGet cmdlets at https://github.com/OneGet/oneget/wiki/cmdlets.

For example here I can find the latest version of zoomit.

C:\> find-package -name zoomit

Name Version Source
---- ------- ------
zoomit 4.50 chocolate

Just to be clear, with regards to OneGet and Chocolatey.

  1. It's an unsupported version of Chocolatey provider in a GitHub repo
  2. Folks can download it using OneGet cmdlets and then using the unsupported provider, you can download Chocolatey packages.
  3. Microsoft is working with the community to take ownership of Chocolatey provider.

And again, you can use Chocolatey TODAY on your Windows 7 and up machines as it is.

Managing MSI-installed Programs with OneGet and PackageManagement

OneGet and PackageManagement in Windows 10 lets you manage package managers of all kinds to control what's installed one your machines. For example, I can uninstall an MSI installed program like this. This is just like visiting Add/Remove Programs (ARP) and uninstalling, except I did it from the command line!

C:\> Uninstall-Package join.me.launcher

Name Version
---- -------
join.me.launcher 1.0.368.0

MSI and Chocolately are just the start for OneGet. What if one package management API could also get Python or PHP packages? Windows Store apps?

OneGet Architecture Diagram - The End user calls PackageManagement APIs that delgate to installed provders that install packages from the original location

Donate to help Chocolatey

Last, but definitely not least, it's important to remember that Chocolatey and the Chocolatey Repository of Packages can use your help and sponsorship. Head over to https://chocolatey.org/ and scroll to the bottom and click Donate and you can Paypal or use your Credit Card to help them out.

SOCIAL: Hey folks, please do follow me on Facebook https://fb.me/scott.hanselman or Twitter! https://twitter.com/shanselman


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Router redirecting to unwanted Adobe Flash update malware site - Moon Virus?

May 29, '15 Comments [37] Posted in Tools
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1000wmainBear with me, for now this will be a tiny post, a placeholder, but I am looking for feedback, ideas, comments and I will keep this post updated.

The scenario: My local sandwich shop where I often hang out and work remotely has a wireless router that started to redirect me to a fake "update your flash" and download a "Install flashplayer_10924_i13445851_il345.exe" malware file. There are no viruses, rootkits, or malware on my PC. This affects their PoS (Point of Sale) system, tablets, iPhones. Also, it's not a DNS hijack, as the URL from the HTTP doesn't change. It's a MitM attack (Man in the Middle) where x number of HTTP GETs work fine and then every few hundred the router returns it's own HTML. The requestor doesn't know the difference.

The router he has is a V1000W Wireless N VDSL Modem Router. I'm suspecting the "Moon" virus but I'm not sure, as this isn't a Linksys. The firmware is ancient from 2009 and that's the latest one I can find.

Before you reply:

  • I'm technical, but the public is often not. Comments like "run openwrt" are certainly valid for a techie, but I'd like to know something more populist:
    • Can this router (and others like it) be fixed? Or is this bricked? Can I flash it with the original firmware to restore?
    • Remote management isn't enabled. What port did the attack happen on?
    • How can I confirm it has it (all signs point to it) with some curl command?
  • What routers have this? What is the source?
  • What can a regular Jane/Joe do about this if they have Frontier/FIOs/CenturyLink, etc?

Thoughts?

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Syncing Windows Live Writer Drafts to the Cloud (Dropbox) and other bug fixes

May 21, '15 Comments [28] Posted in Tools
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I still use Windows Live Writer (http://www.windowslivewriter.com) to post to this blog. It remains the best little blogging app out there. It has a nice plugin ecosystem, great WYSIWYG editor (using IE) even though it hasn't been updated since 2012. A bunch of us are working to get it open sourced, and I'll let you know the second I know something.

But for now, let me fix two things about Windows Live Writer that have been bugging me.

Clearing Cached Blog Themes

First, a small bug. My HTML Styles look like this, and have for a while. See how the background is black? Annoying. I always assumed it was a GDI or graphics bug. In exploring the Windows Live Writer code I learned a few things.

Windows Live Writer with black styles

It turns out that Windows Live Writer is trying to render your styles by using your download blog theme's CSS inside those little boxes! My blog (and others, I've heard) doesn't render nicely.

The downloaded them is stored in %AppData%\Windows Live Writer\blogtemplates and you can easily fix this annoyance by simply deleting the folders below blogtemplates.

Using the Default Windows Live Writer Theme

Ah, much nicer.

Syncing your Windows Live Writer Drafts with OneDrive or Dropbox

I've seen some blog posts with folks suggesting junction or reparse points (symbolic links) to hack together a way to "roam your draft blog posts" with Windows Live Writer. It's much easier than that, in fact. You can just set a registry key with your preferred Drafts folder. I put mine in my Dropbox, but you could also use OneDrive or Box. This means your local draft blog posts will "roam" to all your machines. If you're someone who works on a blog post for a few days you'll appreciate this new ability. You can start a post at work and finish it at home. Even the images will roam.

Head over to HKCU\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows Live\Writer in your registry (via Regedit.exe) and make a new String Value called "Posts Directory."

image

Windows Live Writer will make new Drafts and Recent Posts folders in the location you specify. I set this registry key on all my machines that I have Dropbox installed and now all my blog post drafts are there too!

I hope this helps you out! And I'll be sure to let you know about our plans with Windows Live Writer as soon as I know more. ;)


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.